Wednesday Writing Tip: How to Write Faster: 15 Tips for Maximum Productivity

By: Perfecting Your Craft; Reedsy Blog

Writes faster than a speeding bullet! Words more powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap from one metaphor to the next in a single bound! It’s a bird… it’s a plane… no! It’s Super Writer! 🚀

As great as that sounds, the truth is that writing quickly is no superpower, but a skill that takes time and practice to develop. After all, most writers struggle just getting the right words down on the page, much less speeding through them.

But don’t despair — learning how to write faster may not be easy, but it willbe worth it! From essay crunch time to NaNoWriMo, there are endless scenarios in which speed-writing is an amazing asset. Follow these tips on how to write as fast as possible to start zooming through your projects… and maybe even take on that “Super Writer” alter ego after all.

1. Know your “golden hours”

One of the first things to do is determine your productivity peaks. Every writer has a different routine and lifestyle, which means this varies hugely from person to person: some of us may enjoy a late-night creativity spike, while others prefer the crisp concentration of the early morning.

Whenever this time is for you, max it out! For example, if you know you’re more focused at night, schedule as many after-dinner writing sessions as possible. Or if you work better in a kid-free environment, write when they’re at school or daycare. You may have to do a bit of trial-and-error to determine your own “golden hours” and arrange your schedule around them, but you’ll notice a HUGE difference in output once you do.

2. Create an outline first

Even if you’re a “pantser” who typically rejects structure, outlining is a mustfor anyone who wants to increase their writing speed. Anytime you sit down to write, it’s easy to become overwhelmed by the number of paths you might pursue — but an outline can rescue you by giving you a clear-cut roadmap. You don’t have to plan out every single detail, but having a solid idea of the overall story arc will help you spend more time writing quickly, and less time fretting over what should happen next.

3. Set concrete goals

Most writers understand that goal-setting is important, but for those trying to write faster, it’s absolutely paramount. Without deadlines, your progress will be uneven and you’ll likely lose focus within weeks (if not days). So before you dive in, set challenging-yet-doable goals for yourself at regular intervals.

Don’t worry; you can start off relatively easy. For example, 500 words per session is a reasonable goal for a first-timer. However, if your ultimate objective is to write faster, you should soon be pushing yourself to write 1,000 or even 2,000+ words every session.

Also remember to give yourself proportional rewards! For example, if you do a full week of writing sessions at 500 words/session, you might buy yourself a new book. But when you do your first full week of 2,000 words/session, treat yourself to a nice dinner or tickets to a show — whatever keeps you motivated.

4. Don’t stop to edit

Our next tip is for all you perfectionists out there: don’t stop to edit.There’s no greater productivity killer when trying to write — not only does editing interrupt your creative “flow,” but it’s also just unnecessary. After all, you’re going to edit your book when you’re done, right? Why worry about it now, when you can always change things later?

Of course, this is way easier said than done. So here’s a more realistic proposal: you can edit typos and simple turns of phrase, but try not to spend more than 10 seconds on any correction. Any more and you’ll break your own rhythm and have to force yourself back into focus mode, which is (needless to say) counterproductive to fast writing.

CONTINUE READING…

DG Lamb: Guest Post

Please welcome, my special guest Sci-fi Author DG Lamb to my blog for this special Friday Author Spotlight. He has prepared an awesome guest post! Hope you all enjoy :).

~ World Building ~
The Bridge between Author and Reader

In fantasy and sci fi, world building is all about answering the question: What if? It is the answers to these questions of what if that are the girders of the bridge the reader must cross to enter the author’s imagined world. If there are too few girders or if they are poorly assembled, the bridge’s roadway, the surface on which the reader walks, will be shaky or uneven. The need to sufficiently think out and consistently apply the details of how a futuristic or magical world works creates one of the greatest challenges for the fantasy/sci fi writer. Why? Because the foundational answers to these what if questions are rarely directly referenced in the writing. Or, to continue the analogy, the structure of the bridge is mostly unseen.

For me, the original what if was: What if I was creating a Skinner Box in the future, having all of that advanced technology at my disposal, what would it be like? So, harkening back to your Intro to Psychology class, recall that B F Skinner was a behavioral psychologist who created an operant conditioning chamber in which rats would learn to press a lever to receive a food reward. I began thinking of all of the ways a futuristic room could supply positive and negative responses to the occupant’s behavior: varied lighting levels, colors, temperature, smells, the firmness of the floor – all sorts of ways to shape the person’s behavior. And thus, The Womb was born! But, so what? I had a fantastic room that could do all sorts of neat stuff, but it was just a single girder. So, I needed to answer some more what if questions.

I had to know what kind of society would want to create such a room. Well, we already know it has to be set in the future. But, what if there was a secret order of assassins who kidnapped children and molded them to fill their ranks of covert operators? Hmmm, seems unlikely that people wouldn’t notice that their children were disappearing. OK, what if Earth societies continued their competitive ways and after the discovery of FTL (faster than light) space travel, they so rapidly expanded outward that the space frontier became much like the old Wild West in America? What if law enforcement and governmental oversight lagged far behind this expansion, particularly in the American Sector, where private enterprises were allowed to establish settlements to support capitalist ventures? What if some of these “company colonies” were a bit more relaxed about funding social institutions, such as orphanages, and a significant number of children were left to fend for themselves? Who would notice if a few choice candidates were plucked from this planet or that colony? Wow! Now I have the beginnings of a system of connecting girders that supports the creation of The Womb.

Most of these elements of Joshua’s world are only indirectly referenced, if at all. For example, the fact that a Swedish ex-patriot in Norway discovered FTL travel is not even hinted at until well into the Driven to the Hilt series – the fifth book, in fact. But this girder permits the placement of a tiny tasty detail in The Deepest Cut (Book 1), as the topic for a paper Joshua had to write for his mother. For me, such details are the small sprinkling of spice that brings more flavor to the world, helping the story sparkle with life. Sometimes the need for girders is obvious. I knew I had to support the idea that someone as young as Joshua could survive what was to come. So I tried to establish a strong foundation with the core values instilled by his parents, his obvious intellect, his mother’s loving but unrelenting expectations that he do his best, his greater maturity secondary to being an only child, and his physical prowess and leadership skills by way of the stickball game, among other things. However, sometimes the missing girders wake me up in a cold sweat. For example, after I first wrote about Joshua retrieving Mom’s Fang from Muldavy, I just had him continuing on his way, fighting to survive the malignant attentions of the underbelly of New Cincinnati. But then it struck me, are you serious? Some kid is seen walking into town holding a creature in his hand that is so deadly, the fear of it has kept the colony out of The Swamp since its founding. And this would not get out? This would not make the news? Of course it would. But if such an issue is not addressed, perhaps the reader will not realize exactly what is wrong, but most will hear a hollow thump to their footsteps as they cross the bridge, an untruth that echoes from beneath, causing a dissatisfaction that lingers to the end of the book. And then they will say, “Yeah, that was a pretty good book, I guess.” They will not say, “Now that was a great read! I have to tell my friends about this.”

And so, the unheralded process of writing speculative fiction is supporting the world you create with a sufficient number of properly placed girders. I did this with a wide variety of topics: the weather that produces the permanent overcast of New Cincinnati, the extensive use of lab created foods, the way in which the bottom-line priorities of the sponsoring corporation shaped the colony. And the impact of each of these elements must be taken into account when writing about the people of the settlement. If you have considered all of these things, it will come through in both obvious and subtle aspects of your writing. The logical application of the rules of your world and the glimmers of fine details that you create provides that extra dimension, that rounding of the edges, that filling out of the characters, that makes a good story great.


DG LAMB

DG Lamb is the Clinical Director of a comprehensive neurorehabilitation program. In addition to a doctorate in Clinical Psychology, he has a Master’s degree in Art Therapy. He has also worked with law enforcement officers suffering from PTSD after critical incidents. While recovering from prostate cancer surgery, his son suggested he try his hand at creative writing.

IT’S STALKER TIME! IF YOU’RE NOT STALKING DG LAMB YOU CAN START HERE:
WEBSITE | FB | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

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FINALDriven to the Hilt Book 1DRIVEN TO THE HILT
THE DEEPEST CUT

Already a social outcast because of his father’s alleged betrayal, young Joshua finds himself trapped outside the mining colony on the planet of Cypress Grove. He faces a dark rainforest infested with a creature so deadly, it has kept all humans confined inside their only settlement for decades. If he can manage to escape these alien wilds, he will then have to brave the even darker dangers of the colony’s criminal underworld.

In this original coming of age tale, debut author DG Lamb lays the foundation for the Driven to the Hilt series with plenty of action, unique style, and a richly crafted young hero.

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#AuthorAMA: Different ways to enter the Writing Industry

Yesterday I shared a post from my design blog, KJ Magical Designs, that showcased a question from a #DesignAMA I am taking part in. However, I am not only taking questions on design but also on writing too. I had an interesting one I thought I would source here on my blog.


For a first time author- how many pages would you say is a good start to get published? In the genre of suspense/romance fiction? 

It ranges in each genre and by the audience you are trying to target. Ask yourself if you plan to self-publish, if you will market to an agent or hope to get picked up by a publisher. I did digging into this and found a good infographic on one of my favorite sites (Writer’s Digest). This is a good resource to help you learn the ins and outs of the industry with genres. In no way am I saying this is the only way. Several authors I know entered the industry by building a following on their blogs. One of my favorite authors is Renee Scattergood. She entered the industry by publishing serials of her Shadow Stalker Series.

Short description for serial publications -Instead of waiting for the completed book. This style is made up of short works published in a format similar to television episodes. Renee would group episodes with six to eight chapters within each and would publish them within two months of each other. When she finishes that season (a.k.a book), she would bundle them altogether. She used this as a way to build readership while working on other books.

This way entails extra work and a big requirement is to stick to a schedule. I plan to do this myself with a Paranormal Romance I have in the works. If you decide to try something similar to this style, I would suggest researching authors that do this technique.

***Oh, another site that might work to post your chapters on is ChapterBuzz, it helps you grow readers as you progress through your book. There are several sites that can help you with this, it takes research to find the one you think will fit your needs.


Hope this was interesting to everyone that reads this post. I found it interesting and spent more time contemplating my response before I replied. Makes you realize there is no wrong way to enter the written world as an author. It takes time, determination and research. I wish everyone good luck on their journey to the written world and hope you land among the greats.

If I come across more questions, I think are worth sharing here on my author blog I will keep you in the loop. I plan to send out one more post today, featuring author Allison D. Reid. She released her third book in her series, The Wind Rider Chronicles. Her cover is awesome, I am biased, though, since Alfredo Pachicano and myself are the creators. Hope you will stop by to check it out.

Great Wishes,

K.M. Jenkins 🙂

***If you have a question on the following topic: The Art of Designing and Writing – A Cover Designer/Artist and Indie Author’s Journey AMA. Feel free to ask it here.

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